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Algonquin Park Birding Report

A Celebration of Algonquin Park's Birds Exhibit New Exhibit: A Celebration of Birds of Algonquin Park Extended to July 30, 2014 at the Algonquin Park Visitor Centre

Algonquin Park Birding Reports provide visitors with species observed in recent days within Algonquin Park. Reports are compiled by Ron Tozer. We would greatly appreciate your Algonquin Park bird sightings. Please contact us with your recent sightings.

Upcoming Birding Workshops


April 24, 2014

April 19 marks the first report of Ruffed Grouse drumming in Algonquin Park for 2014. Sample video from "fotojoe390".

Lakes in Algonquin Park remain ice covered, but fast moving creeks and rivers are ice free and water levels remain high. Ice in areas of substantial inflow and outflow is eroding allowing more open water for waterfowl. Snow has disappeared from most areas, but north facing slopes and dense conifer areas are still partially snow covered. Warmer temperatures and rain this week encouraged new spring arrivals, the first amphibian observations, and Moose attracted to thawing roadside ditches containing slightly salty water. See the latest images on Facebook.

The Visitor Centre (at km 43 of Highway 60) has recent bird sightings and information, plus exhibits, bookstore and nature shop, and a restaurant. The Visitor Centre is open 9am to 5pm daily starting April 26, 2014. For more information see the Algonquin Park Events Calendar.

New Spring Bird Arrivals

  • April 17: Common Goldeneye
  • April 18: Savannah Sparrow
  • April 19: Bufflehead, Ruby-crowned Kinglet
  • April 20: Canada Goose (interior subspecies), Broad-winged Hawk, Tree Swallow, Rusty Blackbird, Chipping Sparrow
  • April 21: Osprey, Tundra Swan, Ring-billed Gull, American Bittern, Northern Harrier

Other Noteworthy Sightings:

  • Sandhill Crane (April 17 & 21 along Opeongo Road)
  • Northern Saw-whet Owl (April 18 at Lake of Two Rivers Campground)
  • Green-winged Teal (April 19 at Airfield Marsh, and April 21 & 23 at Opeongo Road/Costello Creek)
  • First Reports of Ruffed Grouse Drumming: April 19
  • First Spring Peeper (frog) Active/Calling: April 21
  • First American Toad Active/Calling: April 21
  • First salamander active: April 21 (Blue-spotted Salamander)
  • Bald Eagle (April 24 at Lookout Trail)

Boreal Specialties:

Spruce Grouse: Observed on April 21 and 24 along the Opeongo Road. Also check near the trail register box at Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on April 19. Check the old telephone poles opposite the entrance to Spruce Bog Boardwalkk, near post 1 of Spruce Bog Boardwalk, or try searching along Opeongo Road.

Gray Jay: Reported regularly at Opeongo Road and Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Boreal Chickadee: Observed on April 21 along the Opeongo Road. Also check Spruce Bog Boardwalk or the Mizzy Lake Trail.

Winter Finches:

Purple Finch: Observed on April 17, 18, 19 and 22 at various locations including the Opeongo Road and the Visitor Centre.

Red Crossbill: Two spotted at Lake of Two Rivers on April 18. Two observed on April 19 along Highway 60.

American Goldfinch: Observed on April 17 at the Algonquin Visitor Centre.

Evening Grosbeak: Numbers of this species are decreasing from winter highs of 60+ birds. On April 21, two were seen at the Visitor Centre, one at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, and 2 along the Opeongo Road. A lone male was also seen at the Visitor Centre today (April 24).

Mammals:

Moose: Numerous along Highway 60 throughout the week. One Park visitor spotted 10 along Highway 60 on April 20. Watch for Moose in roadside ditches drinking slightly salty water from winter road maintenance operations.

Wolf: One spotted on the ice on April 19 near Centennial Ridges Road (km 38).

Otter: Several observed near the Lake Opeongo Access Point over Easter Weekend.

Spring Road Closures:

Birders should be aware that most secondary roads in Algonquin Park are closed for the spring melt. The only exceptions are Opeongo Road (paved) and Arowhon Road to the “crossroads” area about 4 km north of Highway 60. Road such as Source Lake, Rock Lake, Centennial Ridges, and other roads to backcountry access points both along Highway 60 and around the periphery of Algonquin Park remain closed. For more details see the Spring 2014 Bulletin.

Birding Workshops:

The Friends of Algonquin Park are offering birding workshops as part of their Experience Algonquin Workshop Series:

The Demystifying Algonquin Park Bird Song Workshop will be held on May 31/June 1, 2014. Through indoor and field excursions, discover the techniques necessary to identify birds and their songs, comparing similar songsters, and learn how to use today's advanced technology to assist in making an identification. Pre-registration is required.

The Identifying Confusing Fall Warblers Workshop will take place on August 23/24, 2014. Algonquin Park¹s many warbler species often appear very similar and can overwhelm birders when found in large multi-species flocks. Participate in an indoor session to learn techniques to separate confusing fall warblers and then spend the remainder of the workshop using your newly acquired skills in Algonquin Park's best birding areas to identify these fall migrants. Pre-registration is required.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


April 17, 2014

Male Spruce Grouse in Algonquin Park
Male Spruce Grouse observed at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on April 12, 2014.

About 10 centimetres of new snow accumulated during the night and into the day on April 15th, and it continued to cover the previous limited bare ground on the 16th. This resulted in large numbers of sparrows, juncos and blackbirds concentrating at the Visitor Centre feeders on those days, such as 70 Dark-eyed Juncos on the 15th. Open water is restricted to rivers and creeks with current. All lakes and ponds are frozen right to the shore. Still deep snow in shaded forest.

The Algonquin Park Visitor Centre is open throughout Easter weekend for birders.

New Spring Arrivals

April 10: Mallard, Green-winged Teal, Merlin, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Winter Wren
April 11: Common Merganser
April 12: Wood Duck, Red-breasted Merganser, Belted Kingfisher, Bohemian Waxwing, American Tree Sparrow
April 13: Snow Goose
April 14: Ring-necked Duck, Sandhill Crane, Northern Flicker
April 15: Fox Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow
April 16: Sharp-shinned Hawk, Brown Thrasher
April 17: Common Goldeneye

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: A displaying male and a female were seen north of the register book along Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 12th and 13th.

Black-backed Woodpecker: The hole being excavated by a pair in a telephone pole just west of Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 12th was not subsequently attended and likely has been abandoned, as is often the case with these early cavities.

Gray Jay: Reported regularly on Opeongo Road.

Boreal Chickadee: Heard and seen in the black spruce section of Opeongo Road, on Spruce Bog Boardwalk, and along Highway 60 just west of Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 12th.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: A few were seen at the Visitor Centre feeders.

Red Crossbill: Occasional small groups are still being seen along the highway.

White-winged Crossbill: Three were seen on Opeongo Road on the 12th.

Pine Siskin: One or two were noted on Opeongo Road on the 12th.

American Goldfinch: A few were at the Visitor Centre feeders.

Evening Grosbeak: Only about 10 were at the Visitor Centre feeders by the end of the week.

Birding Workshops

The Friends of Algonquin Park are offering birding workshops as part of their Experience Algonquin Workshop Series:

The Demystifying Algonquin Park Bird Song Workshop will be held on May 31/June 1, 2014. Through indoor and field excursions, discover the techniques necessary to identify birds and their songs, comparing similar songsters, and learn how to use today's advanced technology to assist in making an identification. Pre-registration is required.

The Identifying Confusing Fall Warblers Workshop will take place on August 23/24, 2014. Algonquin Park¹s many warbler species often appear very similar and can overwhelm birders when found in large multi-species flocks. Participate in an indoor session to learn techniques to separate confusing fall warblers and then spend the remainder of the workshop using your newly acquired skills in Algonquin Park's best birding areas to identify these fall migrants. Pre-registration is required.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


April 10, 2014

American Black Ducks in Algonquin Park
Spring's first American Black Ducks observed on Costello Creek in Algonquin Park on April 7, 2014.

New arrivals reported this week were: American Black Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Hooded Merganser, Great Blue Heron, Turkey Vulture, Red-tailed Hawk, Killdeer, American Woodcock, Eastern Phoebe, Eastern Bluebird, Song Sparrow, Dark-eyed Junco and Brown-headed Cowbird. Several of these were a week or more later than the average arrival date.

A Nocturnal Owl Survey on the 9th encountered calling Northern Saw-whet Owls at km 0 (West Gate), 4, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 and 18; Barred Owls at km 8 and 18; and howling wolves at Tea Lake Campground and Smoke Lake.

Boreal Specialties:

Spruce Grouse: A displaying male was seen near the register book along Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 6th.

Black-backed Woodpecker: A female was observed, and another bird was heard calling and drumming, near the register book along Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 6th.

Gray Jay: Reported on Opeongo Road, at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and at the Logging Museum.

Boreal Chickadee: Try Opeongo Road.

Winter Finches:

Purple Finch: A few were seen at the Visitor Centre feeders and along the highway.

Red Crossbill: Small groups were reported this week at: km 10, km 30, east of Pog Lake, and the Logging Museum entrance.

White-winged Crossbill: A small flock was heard over Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 6th.

Pine Siskin: One was with a small flock of goldfinches along the highway at Canisbay Creek on the 7th.

American Goldfinch: A few were at the Visitor Centre feeders.

Evening Grosbeak: About 20 were at the Visitor Centre feeders by the end of the week.

Birding Workshops

The Friends of Algonquin Park are offering birding workshops as part of their Experience Algonquin Workshop Series:

The Demystifying Algonquin Park Bird Song Workshop will be held on May 31/June 1, 2014. Through indoor and field excursions, discover the techniques necessary to identify birds and their songs, comparing similar songsters, and learn how to use today's advanced technology to assist in making an identification. Pre-registration is required.

The Identifying Confusing Fall Warblers Workshop will take place on August 23/24, 2014. Algonquin Park¹s many warbler species often appear very similar and can overwhelm birders when found in large multi-species flocks. Participate in an indoor session to learn techniques to separate confusing fall warblers and then spend the remainder of the workshop using your newly acquired skills in Algonquin Park's best birding areas to identify these fall migrants. Pre-registration is required.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


April 3, 2014

Eastern Meadowlark in Algonquin Park
Eastern Meadowlark feeding on sunflower seeds below Visitor Centre feeder on April 2, 2014.

Knee-deep snow and very limited open water continued this week. New arrivals reported were Canada Goose, American Robin, Eastern Meadowlark (one feeding on sunflower seeds below Visitor Centre feeder on the 2nd and 3rd), and Common Grackle.

Northern Saw-whet Owls were calling in the evening on the 30th at Centennial Ridges Road, Lake of Two Rivers Picnic Area, and Two Rivers Trail.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: A male was on the left side of the trail at the end of the long boardwalk on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 31st, and perhaps the same bird was reported on this trail on the 1st.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was seen on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 29th, and one was along the Visitor Centre driveway on the 30th.

Gray Jay: Continue to be seen on Opeongo Road, at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and along the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake section of Mizzy Lake Trail. Young have hatched in four of the 25 nests under surveillance by researchers now.

Boreal Chickadee: One was noted along Opeongo Road on the 30th.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Up to 15 were at the Visitor Centre feeders this week. Small flocks (total of 60 birds) were along Highway 60 on the 30th.

Red Crossbill: Two were along the highway shoulder at Smoke Lake on the 30th.

White-winged Crossbill: Reported at the following locations this week: km 25 (15 birds, including displaying males), Spruce Bog Boardwalk, and Opeongo Road.

Pine Siskin: Two were seen along Opeongo Road on the 30th.

American Goldfinch: Small numbers continue to be seen, at the Visitor Centre feeders. One hundred were counted along Highway 60 on the 30th.

Evening Grosbeak: Up to 30 were at the Visitor Centre feeders this week, especially in the morning.

Mammals

An American Marten was reported in Mew Lake Campground on the 29th, and a Fisher came to the Visitor Centre feeders (for the first time this winter) early in the morning on the 1st (but has not been seen since). Three Eastern Wolves were spotted on Smoke Lake on April 1.

Birding Workshops

The Friends of Algonquin Park are offering birding workshops as part of their Experience Algonquin Workshop Series:

The Demystifying Algonquin Park Bird Song Workshop will be held on May 31/June 1, 2014. Through indoor and field excursions, discover the techniques necessary to identify birds and their songs, comparing similar songsters, and learn how to use today's advanced technology to assist in making an identification. Pre-registration is required.

The Identifying Confusing Fall Warblers Workshop will take place on August 23/24, 2014. Algonquin Park¹s many warbler species often appear very similar and can overwhelm birders when found in large multi-species flocks. Participate in an indoor session to learn techniques to separate confusing fall warblers and then spend the remainder of the workshop using your newly acquired skills in Algonquin Park's best birding areas to identify these fall migrants. Pre-registration is required.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


March 27, 2014

Black-backed Woodpecker in Algonquin Park
Black-backed Woodpecker excavating a cavity in Algonquin Park (read more below).

Reports of new arrivals this week were limited to Herring Gull and Red-winged Blackbird.

A Pine Marten was observed at the Visitor Centre on the 22nd and 23rd, but seeing it again may be difficult since its visits are relatively brief.

Tomorrow (Friday, March 28), you will be able to watch live streaming video of the Visitor Centre bird feeders via the Algonquin Park Webcam

Boreal Specialties:

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk. Males have started to display.

Black-backed Woodpecker: A male was excavating a fairly deep cavity in a dead tree about 150 metres south of the foot bridge at West Rose Lake along the Mizzy Lake Trail on the 21st (see image above). Many of these cavities created in March and early April will be abandoned later. Most nest cavities of this woodpecker that get used are excavated from mid April to mid May.

Gray Jay: Continue to be seen on Opeongo Road, at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and along the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake section of Mizzy Lake Trail. Females are now incubating eggs in most of the 24 nests found by researchers this year.

Boreal Chickadee: One was observed along the old railway bed section of Mizzy Lake Trail on the 21st; and two were at the suet cage opposite the trail register on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 26th, allowing great photo opportunities.

Winter Finches:

Purple Finch: About 20 were at the Visitor Centre feeders and others were seen along Highway 60 this week. Some males are in full song.

Red Crossbill: One was seen on Opeongo Road and two were along Highway 60, on the 21st.

White-winged Crossbill: Two streaked independent juveniles were along the old railway bed section of Mizzy Lake Trail on the 21st. These birds were likely hatched far from Algonquin. The "winter breeding period" (January to March) of the White-winged Crossbill is associated with abundant white spruce cones (Benkman).

Pine Siskin: A single bird was observed along Opeongo Road on the 21st.

American Goldfinch: Small numbers continue to be seen, at the Visitor Centre feeders and along Highway 60.

Evening Grosbeak: Up to 30 were at the Visitor Centre feeders this week, especially in the morning.

Birding Workshops

The Friends of Algonquin Park are offering birding workshops as part of their Experience Algonquin Workshop Series:

The Demystifying Algonquin Park Bird Song Workshop will be held on May 31/June 1, 2014. Through indoor and field excursions, discover the techniques necessary to identify birds and their songs, comparing similar songsters, and learn how to use today's advanced technology to assist in making an identification. Pre-registration is required.

The Identifying Confusing Fall Warblers Workshop will take place on August 23/24, 2014. Algonquin Park¹s many warbler species often appear very similar and can overwhelm birders when found in large multi-species flocks. Participate in an indoor session to learn techniques to separate confusing fall warblers and then spend the remainder of the workshop using your newly acquired skills in Algonquin Park's best birding areas to identify these fall migrants. Pre-registration is required.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


March 20, 2014

New arrivals were limited to two Mourning Doves on the 15th, as abnormally cold temperatures, virtually no open water and lingering deep snow on the ground continue to discourage northward movement by migrants.

One to three Ruffed Grouse and three Wild Turkeys are being observed around the Visitor Centre on most days.

An adult Bald Eagle, some Common Ravens and several Eastern Wolves (mostly at night and near dawn) made short work of the carcass of a road-killed deer placed in the Sunday Creek valley off the Visitor Centre during the last few days of March Break.

Boreal Specialties:

Spruce Grouse: A male and female were seen near the edge of the Sunday Creek Bog south of the highway opposite Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 15th.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was observed along Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 19th.

Gray Jay: Continue to be seen along Opeongo Road, at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and along the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake section of Mizzy Lake Trail. Some females are incubating eggs now, and so there is a reduction in the number of individuals available to be seen.

Boreal Chickadee: One was noted along Opeongo Road on the 15th.

Winter Finches:

Purple Finch: Up to 30 were at the Visitor Centre feeders this week.

Red Crossbill: Flyovers were noted at Beaver Pond Trail on the 15th, and two were seen at Brewer Lake on the 19th.

White-winged Crossbill: Two were along the northern part of Opeongo Road on the 14th; four were at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 16th; and one was at Brewer Lake on the 19th.

Pine Siskin: Four were reported along Highway 60 on the 15th.

American Goldfinch: One or two are regular at the Visitor Centre feeders, and small groups are being seen along Highway 60 and Opeongo Road.

Evening Grosbeak: Up to 43 were at the Visitor Centre feeders this week, especially in the morning.

Birding Workshops

The Friends of Algonquin Park are offering birding workshops as part of their Experience Algonquin Workshop Series:

The Demystifying Algonquin Park Bird Song Workshop will be held on May 31/June 1, 2014. Through indoor and field excursions, discover the techniques necessary to identify birds and their songs, comparing similar songsters, and learn how to use today's advanced technology to assist in making an identification. Pre-registration is required.

The Identifying Confusing Fall Warblers Workshop will take place on August 23/24, 2014. Algonquin Park¹s many warbler species often appear very similar and can overwhelm birders when found in large multi-species flocks. Participate in an indoor session to learn techniques to separate confusing fall warblers and then spend the remainder of the workshop using your newly acquired skills in Algonquin Park's best birding areas to identify these fall migrants. Pre-registration is required.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


March 13, 2014

Purple Finch in Algonquin Park
Northern Saw-whet Owl in Algonquin Park.

Migrants (Northern Saw-whet Owl, American Crow and European Starling) observed this week gave us hope that winter may eventually subside. The Visitor Centre exhibits and restaurant are open daily during March Break.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: One was seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 9th.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was drumming at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 9th and two were heard drumming in black spruce along Opeongo Road on the 10th.

Gray Jay: Being seen along Opeongo Road, at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and along the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake section of Mizzy Lake Trail.

Boreal Chickadee: Three were observed at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 9th, and three were noted along Opeongo Road at the open gate on the 10th.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Up to 30 were at the Visitor Centre feeders this week.

Red Crossbill: A few were reported at various locations this week, including 20 along Highway 60 at km 30 on the 10th.

White-winged Crossbill: Nine were along Opeongo Road on the 8th and 9th; 12 were over Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 8th; and three were near Killarney Lodge on Lake of Two Rivers on the 11th.

Pine Siskin: Three were along Opeongo Road on the 8th, and two were reported along Highway 60 near Killarney Lodge on the 11th.

American Goldfinch: A few are regular at the Visitor Centre feeders, and small groups were frequently seen along Highway 60.

Evening Grosbeak: About 40 were at the Visitor Centre feeders this week, especially in the morning.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


March 6, 2014

Evening Grosbeak in Algonquin Park
Male Evening Grosbeak at Algonquin Visitor Centre with band. Photo by Janice Melendez.

Good winter bird viewing opportunities continue in Algonquin Park, and some amelioration of temperatures is making birding much more pleasant.

The Visitor Centre exhibits and restaurant will be open daily from 9 am to 5 pm during March Break (March 8 to 16, inclusive). This is a great time to come and see the big flock of Evening Grosbeaks at the feeders there, a rare experience in southern Ontario since the 1980s.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: One was seen at the entrance to Opeongo Road on the 1st.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was at campsite #96 in Mew Lake Campground on February 26.

Gray Jay: Being seen along Opeongo Road and at Leaf Lake Ski Trail entrance.

Boreal Chickadee: Try the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake area on Mizzy Lake Trail and the black spruce section along Opeongo Road (which is open and plowed to the access point on Lake Opeongo).

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Small numbers continue to be regular at the Visitor Centre feeders.

Red Crossbill: A few reported along Highway 60 and Opeongo Road.

White-winged Crossbill: Observed at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and along Opeongo Road.

American Goldfinch: A few are regular at the Visitor Centre feeders, and along Highway 60.

Evening Grosbeak: About 35 were at the Visitor Centre feeders this week, especially in the morning.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


February 27, 2014

Gray Jay in Algonquin Park
Gray Jay

Winter continues unabated in Algonquin, but a few very early signs of spring are being noted. Barred Owls and Northern Saw-whet Owls are calling near the Park, and likely within it as well although unreported. Researchers have now found eight Gray Jay nests under construction.

Tomorrow (Friday, February 28), you will be able to watch live streaming video of the Visitor Centre bird feeders via the Algonquin Park Webcam.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: One was observed feeding in a spruce at campsite #1 in Mew Lake Campground on February 22. Although infrequently seen in this campground, Spruce Grouse inhabit nearby spruce stands bordering the Madawaska River.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Try the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake area on Mizzy Lake Trail.

Gray Jay: Seen regularly along Opeongo Road and at Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Boreal Chickadee: The Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake area on Mizzy Lake Trail and the black spruce section along Opeongo Road continue to produce sightings.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Regular at the Visitor Centre feeders, and elsewhere along Highway 60 such as the entrance to Mew Lake Campground where they are frequently seen feeding on ash seeds.

Red Crossbill: A few are being seen and heard at various locations along Highway 60 and Opeongo Road.

White-winged Crossbill: Good locations to observe this species include Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

American Goldfinch: A few are regular at the Visitor Centre feeders.

Evening Grosbeak: About 45 were at the Visitor Centre feeders this week, especially in the morning.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


February 20, 2014

Despite this winter's very cold temperatures and deep snow here, remnants of earlier groups of Wild Turkeys still persisted this week: Mew Lake Campground (1), Trailer Sanitation Station (2) and Visitor Centre (1).

The first Gray Jay nest under construction was found on the 18th. The nest of this same banded pair was the first one discovered last year as well, but on February 24, nearly a week later. Spring has sprung!

The frequency of calling by Boreal Chickadees increases from late February through March and reaches a peak just before winter flock breakup. More calling makes it easier to locate them in the dense spruce foliage they frequent. Observations this week suggest that increased calling may be starting to occur.

Numbers of both crossbill species continue to be low, but reports are increasing as the weather improves and more birders are out looking.

The first Pine Siskin reports since early December occurred this week.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: One was displaying along Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 16th.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was seen between Wolf Howl Pond and March Hare Lake on the Mizzy Lake Trail on the 15th. Another was drumming and calling at km 7 on Highway 60 on the 16th.

Gray Jay: Regular along Opeongo Road, at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, near the East Gate, and in Mew Lake Campground.

Boreal Chickadee: On the 15th, eight were reported near West Rose Lake on Mizzy Lake Trail; two were visiting the suet feeder opposite the register box on Spruce Bog Boardwalk; and one was along Opeongo Road. Three were seen on Bat Lake Trail on the 17th.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Up to 45 were at the Visitor Centre feeders, and small flocks were observed along Highway 60.

Red Crossbill: Groups of two to seven were observed on Bat Lake Trail, on Spruce Bog Boardwalk, along Highway 60, and at the East Gate this week.

White-winged Crossbill: Locations with small flocks included along Highway 60, Mizzy Lake Trail, Bat Lake Trail, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Pine Siskin: There were three on the Barron Canyon Trail (east side of Algonquin Park) on the 15th; three along Opeongo Road on the 16th; and three on Bat Lake Trail on the 17th.

American Goldfinch: Small flocks are present along Highway 60 getting grit. There were 93 counted along the road on the 15th.

Evening Grosbeak: Up to 60 were at the Visitor Centre feeders this week, especially in the morning.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


February 13, 2014

Hood Merganser (pair) in Algonquin Park
Hooded Merganser (pair)

A male Hooded Merganser was found on the side of Highway 60 near West Smith Lake in late morning on February 11, but had disappeared soon after when Visitor Centre staff arrived to rescue it. The wet pavement from melting snow was probably mistaken for open water by the bird.

An adult male Northern Goshawk was mobbed by about 20 Blue Jays when it hopped on the ground and then flew to a low branch near the Visitor Centre feeders on February 7. It was likely hunting the Ruffed Grouse or red squirrels that regularly frequent the area.

Among many events at the third annual Winter in the Wild Festival in Algonquin Park this weekend will be guided bird walks at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, from 10:00am to 11:30am and from 2:30pm to 4:00 pm on Saturday, February 15, 2014.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was observed near West Rose Lake on Mizzy Lake Trail on February 11.

Gray Jay: Regular along Opeongo Road, at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, near the East Gate, and in Mew Lake Campground.

Boreal Chickadee: Single birds were observed near West Rose Lake on Mizzy Lake Trail on February 8 and 11, and along Spruce Bog Boardwalk on February 8.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Up to 12 are coming to the Visitor Centre feeders, and a few were occasionally observed along Highway 60.

Red Crossbill: Three were noted at Brewer Lake on February 8.

White-winged Crossbill: Four were at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and one was along Fen Lake Ski Trail, on February 8.

American Goldfinch: Occasional at the Visitor Centre, and a few were seen along Highway 60.

Evening Grosbeak: As many as 55 were at the Visitor Centre feeders this week, especially in the morning.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


February 6, 2014

Wild Turkey in Algonquin Park
Wild Turkey

The seven Wild Turkeys regularly frequenting the Visitor Centre feeders earlier in the winter have diminished to one now. The reduction may be due to dispersal, predation and/or starvation. A few are still being seen along the highway also, far from feeders. The deep snow and cold temperatures this year have likely been hard on this species here. By 2002, turkeys had spread into Algonquin from nearby populations derived from re-introduced birds. The original southern Ontario range of the Wild Turkey did not extend northward to Algonquin Park.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road (accessible by vehicle only to the locked gate).

Gray Jay: Regular along Opeongo Road, at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, near the East Gate, and in Mew Lake Campground.

Boreal Chickadee: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road. One was noted at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on February 1.

Black-backed Woodpecker: On January 31, one was observed on a dead conifer near the Beaver Ponds area close to Heron Lake on the Ridge section of Fen Lake Ski Trail, and another was seen on a dead hemlock near Dizzy Lake on the Mizzy Lake Trail.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Up to 20 are coming to the Visitor Centre feeders, and small flocks were occasionally observed along Highway 60.

White-winged Crossbill: Four flew over the Visitor Centre on February 2.

American Goldfinch: One is regular at the Visitor Centre, and a few were seen along Highway 60.

Evening Grosbeak: About 35 were regular at the Visitor Centre feeders this week, especially in the morning.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


January 30, 2014

Bald Eagle (adult)
Bald Eagle

Two or three Ruffed Grouse continue to provide great photographic and viewing opportunities daily as they eat seed below the feeders at the Visitor Centre.

A Bald Eagle calling in flight alerted birders to its presence over Spruce Bog Boardwalk on January 27. A few Bald Eagles and Golden Eagles regularly spend the winter in Algonquin Park, but they are observed infrequently. These eagles feed mainly on wolf kills here.

A Boreal Owl was found dead on the front porch of a home near Oxtongue Lake (Highway 60 west of Algonquin Park) on January 13, likely a window kill. The specimen will be preserved. I mention it here since this species has been extremely rare in southern Ontario this winter.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Gray Jay: Regular along Opeongo Road, at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, near the East Gate, and in Mew Lake Campground.

Boreal Chickadee: On January 27, one along Opeongo Road and two at Spruce Bog Boardwalk were first detected by their calls and were with Black-capped Chickadees.

Black-backed Woodpecker: No reports.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Three to eight are still coming to the Visitor Centre feeders, and small flocks were occasionally observed along Highway 60.

Red Crossbill: Observations on Highway 60 were of four at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and six between Opeongo Road and the East Gate on January 27.

White-winged Crossbill: Seven were noted along Opeongo Road on January 27, and one was calling in flight at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on January 28. Two were at Spruce Bog today.

American Goldfinch: One or two are regular at theVisitor Centre, and a few were seen along Highway 60.

Evening Grosbeak: About 20 to 35 were regular at theVisitor Centre feeders this week, especially in the morning. There were 60 there early on January 27.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


January 23, 2014

Evening Grosbeak in Algonquin Park
Evening Grosbeak (male)

The finch species and numbers of individuals present here now are similar to those seen when winter birding officially began on December 1. Pine Grosbeaks have remained in the north where they are sustained by bumper mountain-ash berry crops, as predicted in Ron Pittaway's annual winter finch forecast. Most redpolls were expected to stay in the north because birch, alder and conifer seed crops are generally good across the boreal forest. So far they have, but a redpoll flight to southern Ontario may yet occur this winter if food availability lessens in the north.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Gray Jay: Regular along Opeongo Road, at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, near the East Gate, and in Mew Lake Campground.

Boreal Chickadee: One was seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on January 19, and a single bird was noted along Opeongo Road on January 19 and 20.

Black-backed Woodpecker: No reports.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Up to six are now coming to the Visitor Centre feeders.

Red Crossbill: One or two on January 18 and two on January 19 were at Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

American Goldfinch: About three are regular at the Visitor Centre, and others were seen along Highway 60.

Evening Grosbeak (shown above right): Up to 49 were regular at the Visitor Centre feeders this week.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


January 16, 2014

Two or three Ruffed Grouse were feeding

Ruffed Grouse at Algonquin Park in winter
Ruffed Grouse

regularly under the Visitor Centre feeders this week.

Wild Turkeys were noted along Highway 60 west of Lookout Trail and at Opeongo Road, apparently coping with the recent cold and deep snow.

A Bald Eagle flew over the Visitor Centre on January 12.

Twelve Snow Buntings on the Visitor Centre parking lot the same day were typical of high winter numbers in our contiguous forest habitat.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: No reports. Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Gray Jay: Regular along Opeongo Road, at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, near the East Gate, and in Mew Lake Campground.

Boreal Chickadee: No reports. Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Black-backed Woodpecker: A male and a female were at Tea Lake Dam on January 15.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Up to 25 are regular at the Visitor Centre, and others were seen along Highway 60.

Red Crossbill: One was on the highway at Track and Tower Trail (km 24) on January 12.

White-winged Crossbill: Four were observed at Spruce Bog Boardwalk today.

American Goldfinch: Up to 25 are regular at the Visitor Centre, and others were seen along Highway 60.

Evening Grosbeak: Up to 45 were regular at the Visitor Centre feeders this week.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


January 9, 2014

Noteworthy birds in Whitney (east of Algonquin Park on Highway 60) this week included: Common Goldeneyes (8) and Hooded Mergansers (2) on the Madawaska River on January 4; a Northern Mockingbird along the river near the highway on January 4 and 5; and Bohemian Waxwings (6) on January 8.

A revised update of Ron Tozer's book, Birds of Algonquin Park, including new earliest and latest migration dates plus rarity records is now available at www.algonquinpark.on.ca/bap

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: A female was observed along Spruce Bog

Gray Jay in Algonquin Park
Gray Jay (banded)

Boardwalk on January 2.

Gray Jay (shown): Regular along Opeongo Road, at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, near the East Gate, and in Mew Lake Campground.

Boreal Chickadee: Seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, including on the suet feeder near the trail register box.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Just three were found by 84 observers on the Algonquin Park Christmas Bird Count (January 4).

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Up to 15 are regular at the Visitor Centre, and others were seen along Opeongo Road and along Highway 60. There were 321 on the Christmas Bird Count (January 4).

Red Crossbill: One on the highway at Found Lake and two at Lake of Two Rivers on January 1.Two west of Beaver Pond Trail on January 4. Thirty-five were seen on the Christmas Bird Count on January 4.

White-winged Crossbill: A few along Highway 60, including 12 seen on the Christmas Bird Count on January 4.

American Goldfinch: A few are regular at the Visitor Centre and small flocks are along Highway 60. There were 201 on the Christmas Bird Count (January 4).

Evening Grosbeak: Up to about 35 were regular at the Visitor Centre this week, and a few were noted elsewhere as well.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


January 5, 2014

Results of the 2013 Algonquin Park Christmas Bird Count are now available.


January 2, 2014

A revised update of Ron Tozer's book, Birds of Algonquin Park, including new earliest and latest migration dates plus rarity records is now available at www.algonquinpark.on.ca/bap

Six Wild Turkeys are daily visitors to the Visitor Centre feeders, as is a Ruffed Grouse.

Pine Martens are being seen at the bird seed people leave near the open gate on Opeongo Road, and in Mew Lake Campground.

The Visitor Centre is open daily, 9 am to 5 pm, from December 27 to January 5. Opeongo Road is open and plowed right to the lake.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Gray Jay: Regular along Opeongo Road, at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, in the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake area, and in Mew Lake Campground.

Boreal Chickadee: Five were observed on the rail bed between Arowhon Road and Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake area on December 28, and one was seen there on December 30. One calling on Opeongo Road at Cameron Lake Road today was easily pished in for good views.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was along the rail bed between Arowhon Road and the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake area on December 29, and another was reported along Opeongo Road on December 30.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Up to 20 are regular at the Visitor Centre, and some are being observed at other sites along Highway 60.

Red Crossbill: Five were seen near km 33 on Highway 60 on January 1.

American Goldfinch: A few are regular at the Visitor Centre and occasionally along Highway 60.

Evening Grosbeak: Up to about 35 were regular at the Visitor Centre this week.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


December 26, 2013

A half dozen Wild Turkeys continue to come to get seed below the Visitor Centre feeders.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Gray Jay: Regular along Opeongo Road and at Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Boreal Chickadee: Try the black spruce section along Opeongo Road.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Try Opeongo Road.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: About 15 are regular at the Visitor Centre.

White-winged Crossbill: A small flock was on Highway 60 near Lookout Trail on the 19th.

American Goldfinch: A few are regular at the Visitor Centre and occasionally along Highway 60.

Evening Grosbeak: Up to about 45 were regular at the Visitor Centre this week.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


December 19, 2013

With the Christmas Bird Count (CBC) season keeping many birders busy, the only reports received here this week were of birds at the Visitor Centre feeders. Winter finches remain low in numbers and limited to two or three species in southern Ontario, including Algonquin Park, as reflected in CBC reports to date.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Gray Jay: Regular along Opeongo Road and at Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Boreal Chickadee: Try the black spruce section along Opeongo Road.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Try Opeongo Road.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Regular at the Visitor Centre in numbers up to 26.

American Goldfinch: A few are regular at the Visitor Centre and along Highway 60.

Evening Grosbeak: Up to about 25 were regular at the Visitor Centre this week.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


December 12, 2013

Noteworthy Sightings

Snowy Owl (Wikimedia stock image by Bert de Tilly)
Snowy Owl

A Snowy Owl (shown right) was observed at West Rose Lake on the Mizzy Lake Trail near noon on the 8th. Searches for the owl later that day and on the 10th were unsuccessful. This species is seen very rarely in Algonquin Park, even during major irruptions to southern Ontario like this year. Occurrences here are almost always on one day only, probably because productive foraging areas are lacking and so the owls move through quickly.

A Great Gray Owl was seen seven kilometres up the Sunday Lake Road (a logging road closed to public travel at km 40.3) on the 10th. This bird may have been from farther north, but it could be part of the very small resident population here.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: A male was just north of the register box on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 7th.

Gray Jay: Regular in Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake section of Mizzy Lake Trail, along Opeongo Road and at Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Boreal Chickadee: Single birds were observed at the gate and north of there in the Black Spruce section on Opeongo Road on the 7th.

Black-backed Woodpecker: No reports. Try Opeongo Road.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Small numbers at several locations this week, and over 30 at the Visitor Centre today.

Pine Siskin: Three were in a flock of 50 American Goldfinches on Highway 60 at km 4 on the 7th, and three were near the West Gate on the 8th.

American Goldfinch: A few are regular at the Visitor Centre feeder, and numbers are increasing along Highway 60 and Opeongo Road.

Evening Grosbeak: Numbers at the Visitor Centre feeder continue to grow, reaching 38 on the 10th.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


December 5, 2013

The Visitor Centre feeders continued to host Ruffed Grouse (female), Purple Finch, American Goldfinch, and Evening Grosbeak (shown right). A flock of 14 Wild Turkeys was photographed at Lookout Trail parking lot on the 2nd. A Northern Shrike was at Mew Lake on the 4th.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: No reports. Try Opeongo Road and Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Gray Jay: Regular along Opeongo Road and at Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Boreal Chickadee: No reports. Try Spruce Bog and the Wolf Howl Pond area.

Black-backed Woodpecker: No reports. Try Opeongo Road.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Small numbers continued at the Visitor Centre feeder.

White-winged Crossbill: Three at km 4 and about six at km 24 were reported on the 28th. Several small flocks were along Highway 60 between Madawaska and Whitney (east of Algonquin Park) on the same day.

American Goldfinch: A few are regular at the Visitor Centre feeder, and small flocks are being seen getting salt and grit along Highway 60.

Evening Grosbeak: Up to 23 have been seen daily at the Visitor Centre feeder this week, especially early in the morning.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


Summary of Algonquin Park Bird Observations: August 1 to November 30, 2013 compiled by Ron Tozer

Mild temperatures until mid-October probably contributed to record late dates for 10 species (see list below). Unusually cold conditions occurred at the end of the period which resulted in early freezing of most lakes. Lake of Two Rivers became completely ice-covered on Friday (November 29), the second earliest date since record-keeping was started in 1972. The earliest date for total ice cover on this lake was 28 November 1995 and the latest was 27 December 2001 and 2006.

As usual, there were some sightings of birds that are rare in Algonquin and these are also listed below.

Record Late Fall Dates (10 species)

American Bittern
-October 14, Lake Travers Marsh, one flushed, Mark Patry (Previous Latest: October 13)

Virginia Rail
- October 7, Lake Travers Marsh, one flushed, Lev Frid (Previous Latest: September 25)

Long-eared Owl
- October 20, Airfield Woods, one roosting, Lev Frid. Seen later by David LeGros (Previous Latest: October 4)

Eastern Bluebird
- October 27, Airfield, male, Bruce M. Di Labio (Previous Latest: October 26)

Wood Thrush
- September 20, Opeongo Road, one, Michael W. P. Runtz (Previous Latest: September 19)

American Pipit
- November 18, Opeongo Road, two, Don Docherty and Ann Hide (Ties previous latest date.)

Northern Parula
- September 23, near West Rose Lake, female, Blake A. Mann (Previous Latest: September 22)

Blackburnian Warbler
- October 1, near Canoe Lake, one, Kathleen Blair and Jan Richmond (Previous Latest: September 27)

Yellow Warbler
- September 14, Canoe Lake, one, Jan Richmond (Previous Latest: September 12)

Nelson's Sparrow
- October 17, Lake Travers Marsh, one, Michael W.P. Runtz (Previous Latest: October 14)

Rare Species in Algonquin Park

Northern Shoveler
- August 22, Lake Travers, two (photos), Jeff H. Skevington and Richard P. Skevington

Northern Pintail
- October 6, Lake Travers, flock of 9 (males and females) at 8 am, and three females at 2.15 pm, Jeff H. Skevington
- October 7, Lake Travers marsh, male, Lev Frid

Greater Scaup
- October 6, Lake Travers, male, Jeff H. Skevington

Surf Scoter
- October 6, Lake Travers, four, Jeff H. Skevington
- October 3 to 17, Kearney Lake, female or immature, Lev Frid, David LeGros, Rick Stronks, et al.
- October 17, Lake Travers, one, Michael W.P. Runtz

Horned Grebe
- October 7, McCraney Lake, flock of 10 landed after rain and wind, Lyle Friesen

Red-necked Grebe
- October 14, Lake Travers, three, Mark Patry
- November 3, Opeongo Access Point, one, Paul and Wendy White, Dawn Sherman
- November 16, Lake of Two Rivers, one, Ronald G. Tozer

Golden Eagle
- October 1, West Rose Lake, juvenile (photo), Norm and Cindy Ferguson, Mark Webber
- October 18, Visitor Centre, one, Wendy White
- October 20, Opeongo Access Point to over Visitor Centre driveway, juvenile (photos), Lev Frid
- October 24, NE of Visitor Centre, adult, Tim Logan
- October 24, Lookout Trail, adult, Tim Logan

Sandhill Crane
- August 26, shore of Burnt Island Lake, two, George Quimby and Steve Cudbertson

Black-bellied Plover
- August 16, Radiant Lake, one, Reuven D. Martin, Peter B. Mills, et al.
- October 8, Lake Travers, one calling overhead, Lev Frid

Sanderling
- August 16, Radiant Lake, two, Reuven D. Martin, Peter B. Mills, et al.

Semipalmated Sandpiper
- August 16, Radiant Lake, two, Reuven D. Martin, Peter B. Mills, et al.
- August 22, Lake Travers, two (photos), Jeff H. Skevington and Richard P. Skevington

Least Sandpiper
- August 16, Radiant Lake, 11, Reuven D. Martin, Peter B. Mills, et al.

Baird's Sandpiper
- August 16, Radiant Lake, four, Reuven D. Martin, Peter B. Mills, et al.

Pectoral Sandpiper
- September 10, Lake Travers, one, Jeff H. Skevington
- October 10, Poplar Rapids at Lake Travers, four, Rick Stronks

Bonaparte's Gull
- July 29 to August 9, Canoe Lake, adult (photos), Kathleen Blair and Jan Richmond
- August 4, Lake Travers, adult, Frank Pinilla

Caspian Tern
- August 7, Trailer Sanitation Station, one flying west and calling in flight several times at 1.20 am (during wolf howling work), Lev Frid NINTH PARK RECORD

Common Tern
- August 26, Radiant Lake, three adults and two juveniles (not raised locally), Michael W.P. Runtz

Great Gray Owl
- August 22, km 66.6 on Barron Canyon Road (about 5 km east of Lake Travers), adult photographed and juvenile food calls heard, Jeff H. Skevington and Richard P. Skevington. ABOUT EIGHTH TIME BREEDING EVIDENCE HAS BEEN NOTED IN ALGONQUIN PARK.

Long-eared Owl
- October 20, Airfield Woods, one roosting, Lev Frid. Seen later by David LeGros

Peregrine Falcon
- August 2, Barron Canyon, two flying, Michael W.P. Runtz
- October 6, Lake Travers, total of four moving south between 8.15 and 9.15 am, Jeff H. Skevington

Cliff Swallow
- July 30, Canisbay Lake, two, Frank Pinilla

Brown Thrasher
- September 11, Lake Travers, one, Lev Frid
- September 12, McManus Lake, one, Lev Frid

Orange-crowned Warbler
- September 24, Rock Lake, two, Blake A. Mann
- September 25, Bat Lake Trail, one, Annie and Bog Riggs
- October 2, Track and Tower Trail, one, Jan Richmond

Blackpoll Warbler
- August 31, West Rose Lake, one, Lev Frid, et al.
- September 1, Basin Road, one, Michael W.P. Runtz
- September 1, Tanamakoon Trail, one, Reuven D. Martin, Peter B. Mills
- September 2, Found Lake, one, Reuven D. Martin
- September 9, Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake, one, Peter Blancher
- September 10, Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake, three, Lev Frid
- September 24, Rock Lake, two Blake A. Mann
- September 25, Mizzy Lake Trail, one, Lev Frid

Le Conte's Sparrow
- October 6, Lake Travers, one, Jeff H. Skevington
- October 10, Lake Travers Marsh, two to four, David LeGros, Dawn Sherman, Rick Stronks, Ronald G. Tozer
- October 13, Lake Travers Marsh, one, James Helmer

Nelson's Sparrow
- October 6, Lake Travers Marsh, 26 reported; marsh at northwest end of Lake Travers, three reported; Jeff H. Skevington
- October 8, Lake Travers Marsh, 12, Lev Frid
- October 10, Lake Travers Marsh, 12 to 15, David LeGros, Dawn Sherman, Rick Stronks, Ronald G. Tozer
- October 13, Lake Travers Marsh, two, James Helmer
- October 14, Lake Travers Marsh, six, Mark Patry
- October 17, Lake Travers Marsh, one, Michael W. P. Runtz
MOST REPORTED OF ANY FALL IN ALGONQUIN

Eastern Meadowlark
- October 24, Big Pines Trail parking lot, one, Rachel Derbyshire

Please send us any additional bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


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