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Algonquin Park Birding Report

Hooded Mergansers in Algonquin Park

Algonquin Park Birding Reports provide visitors with species observed in recent days within Algonquin Park. Reports are compiled by Ron Tozer. We would greatly appreciate your Algonquin Park bird sightings. Please contact us with your recent sightings.

More About the Birds of Algonquin Park

Birds of Algonquin ParkBirds of Algonquin Park authored by retired Algonquin Park Naturalist Ron Tozer presents detailed accounts of all 278 birds known to have occurred in Algonquin Park. The book includes information on migration timing, nesting habits and behaviour of the 144 breeding species, winter occurrence, historical records and population trends. The influence of climate warming on the arrival and departure time of migrants, and the declining numbers of many species are discussed. This 480-page masterpiece filled with illustrations and images is available for purchase online or at any of The Friends of Algonquin Park stores.


January 10, 2019

The apparent movement of winter finches through Algonquin Park that has been observed during this late fall/early winter may have largely ended. Numbers and species reported are fairly consistent now. However, the arrival of more finches later this winter is still possible, especially if food sources to the north diminish.

Red Crossbill in Algonquin Park

Adult male Red Crossbill in Algonquin Park. Photo by Lev Frid.

Boreal Residents

  • Spruce Grouse: a female was seen between posts 2 and 3 on the Bat Lake Trail (Jan 8); Spruce Bog Boardwalk (especially from the entrance to the long boardwalk across the Sunday Creek Bog) is still the best place to search for this species.
  • Black-backed Woodpecker: one was found along Spruce Bog Boardwalk (Jan 7).
  • Boreal Chickadee: from one to three birds were seen and heard at Spruce Bog Boardwalk this week; and singles were 200 metres north of the winter gate on Opeongo Road (Jan 6), along Bat Lake Trail (Jan 8), and heard calling in response to “pishing” near the feeders off the Visitor Centre deck (Jan 8).
  • Canada Jay: regular at Mew Lake Campground, the Spruce Bog Boardwalk suet feeder, the Visitor Centre suet feeder, along Opeongo Road from the winter gate northward, and along the Logging Museum trail.

Winter Finches

  • Evening Grosbeak: seven were counted at the Visitor Centre feeders early in the week but there was only one over the last four days.
  • Pine Grosbeak: from ten to 35 were noted daily at the Visitor Centre; and others continued to be observed along the highway.
  • Common Redpoll: observations of five or fewer birds occurred at the Visitor Centre feeders, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.
  • Red Crossbill: three were noted flying over the parking lot near the winter gate on Opeongo Road (Jan 5).
  • Pine Siskin: a single bird was at Spruce Bog Boardwalk (Jan 7).
  • American Goldfinch: five continued to be seen each day at the Visitor Centre.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


January 3, 2019

The influx of birders during this week of the holidays and 83 observers on the Algonquin Park Christmas Bird Count of December 29, 2018 combined to produce a better idea of the birds along the Highway 60 Corridor. However, the number of species and individuals observed remained low.

A male and female Bufflehead were reported in open water at km 53 on Highway 60 (Dec 28; a new latest date for the species); and a roosting Northern Saw-whet Owl being mobbed by Black-capped Chickadees and two Boreal Chickadees was found at Spruce Bog Boardwalk (Dec 29).

Pine Grosbeak in Algonquin Park

Male Pine Grosbeak in Algonquin Park. Photo by Michael Runtz.

Boreal Residents

  • Spruce Grouse: a male was seen near the first boardwalk section of Spruce Bog Boardwalk on several days.
  • Black-backed Woodpecker: there were sightings on Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Two Rivers Trail, and near the Trailer Sanitation Station.
  • Boreal Chickadee: up to three were along Spruce Bog Boardwalk, often near the suet feeder; one was heard near the Mew Lake Campground garbage facilities; and one was near the Trailer Sanitation Station.
  • Canada Jay: was regular at the Spruce Bog Boardwalk suet feeder, along Opeongo Road from the winter gate northward, and along the Logging Museum trail.

Winter Finches

  • Evening Grosbeak: daily counts at the Visitor Centre feeders were from four to seven, and a few were attracted to seed at Spruce Bog Boardwalk entrance as well.
  • Pine Grosbeak: from five to 22 were noted daily at the Visitor Centre; others were observed along the highway; and the CBC total was 52 (Dec 29).
  • Common Redpoll: only sightings were two found on the CBC (Dec 29).
  • Pine Siskin: a single bird was at the Visitor Centre (Dec 29). American Goldfinch: five were seen each day at the Visitor Centre.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


Algonquin Park Christmas Bird Count - December 29, 2018

Eighty-three observers undertook the 45th Algonquin Park Christmas Bird Count (CBC) on Saturday, December 29, 2018, a beautiful winter day in Algonquin Park. For full count details see Algonquin Park Christmas Bird Count Results 2018.

Northern Saw-whet Owl in Algonquin Park

Northern Saw-whet Owl found being mobbed by Black-capped Chickadees and two Boreal Chickadees at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on the 45th Algonquin Park Christmas Bird Count. Photo by Lev Frid.


December 27, 2018

Birding in Algonquin was limited during the Christmas week and so there is relatively little new information to report. Ruffed Grouse (one), and Wild Turkey (five) continued at the Visitor Centre feeders all week, but the Common Grackle that had been there daily since November 12 was last observed on Dec 23 and the first-year female Hoary Redpoll was last at the feeders on Dec 21.

Pine Siskin

Pine Siskin. Photo by Mike McEvoy.

Boreal Residents

  • Spruce Grouse: one was seen along Spruce Bog Boardwalk on Dec 20.
  • Black-backed Woodpecker: no reports; look for it at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and north of the winter gate on Opeongo Road.
  • Boreal Chickadee: one was observed on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on Dec 22.
  • Canada Jay: regular at the Spruce Bog Boardwalk suet feeders, along Opeongo Road from the winter gate northward, and along the Logging Museum trail. 

Winter Finches

  • Evening Grosbeak: daily counts at the Visitor Centre feeders ranged from one to six.
  • Pine Grosbeak: from eight to 15 were noted daily at the Visitor Centre and a few were observed along the highway.
  • Common Redpoll: up to 14 were at the Visitor Centre feeders early in the week.
  • Pine Siskin: reports were of five (Dec 20) and one (Dec 22) at the Visitor Centre.
  • American Goldfinch: a few seen each day at the Visitor Centre, with a report of 25 on Dec 22.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


December 20, 2018

Noteworthy Observations

The weather was more birder-friendly this week, which resulted in more reports. Noteworthy for Algonquin were: a Northern Shrike photographed just east of km 43 (Dec 15); nine Bohemian Waxwings near the Visitor Centre parking lot feeder (Dec 18); and two Snow Buntings at the Visitor Centre (Dec 15). Ruffed Grouse (one), Wild Turkey (five) and Common Grackle (one) were at the feeders all week. A drumming male Ruffed Grouse heard on Opeongo Road (Dec 18) was inspired by day-length like spring.

Boreal Chickadee in Algonquin Park

Image: Boreal Chickadee at Spruce Bog Boardwalk Trail, 16 December 2018. Photo by Rick Lauzon.

Boreal Residents

  • Spruce Grouse: two were reported at Spruce Bog Boardwalk (Dec 15), including a female high in a tree near the entrance; and a female roosting in a tree was observed off the main trail at Spruce Bog (Dec 20).
  • Black-backed Woodpecker: singles were on Spruce Bog Boardwalk (Dec 15 and 19); and two females were found on Opeongo Road (Dec 18).
  • Boreal Chickadee: one was photographed and there was possibly a second bird near the suet feeder, and one was far away from the main trail and its Black-capped Chickadee flock, on Spruce Bog Boardwalk (Dec 15). One was also photographed on this trail (Dec 16).
  • Canada Jay: seen at the Visitor Centre and Spruce Bog Boardwalk suet feeders, along Opeongo Road from the winter gate northward and along the Logging Museum trail this week.

Winter Finches

  • Evening Grosbeak: daily counts at the Visitor Centre feeders ranged from one to seven, and a single bird was seen on Opeongo Road (Dec 18).
  • Pine Grosbeak: from six to eighteen were noted daily at the Visitor Centre and a few were observed along the highway on some days.
  • Common Redpoll: up to ten were present each day at the Visitor Centre.
  • Hoary Redpoll: the first-year female continued to come to the Visitor Centre feeders all week and a male was photographed there as well (Dec 16).
  • Red Crossbill: two were reported at Spruce Bog Boardwalk (Dec 15).
  • Pine Siskin: reports were of three (Dec 14) and one (Dec 16) at the Visitor Centre.
  • American Goldfinch: numbers observed increased this week, with from six to ten at the Visitor Centre (Dec 15 to 20).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


December 13, 2018

There were fewer reports this week, but some interesting observations. On Dec 8, a Northern Shrike made an unsuccessful pass at one of the many Black-capped Chickadees coming to bird seed left by park visitors near the winter gate on Opeongo Road. A light-coloured redpoll was seen in a small flock of Common Redpolls late in the day at the Visitor Centre on Dec 12, and probably the same group returned today. Photos were taken which confirmed a Hoary Redpoll, an apparent first year female showing buffy colour around the face. A Snow Bunting came to the Visitor Centre feeders on Dec 10. Ruffed Grouse (one), Wild Turkey (three) and Common Grackle (one) continued at the feeders all week. The Spruce Bog suet feeder is attracting Black-capped Chickadees and Red-breasted Nuthatches that readily come to the hand for food. An American Marten was photographed there this week as well.

Hoary Redpoll in Algonquin Park

Image: First year female Hoary Redpoll at Visitor Centre, 13 December 2018. Photo by Rick Stronks.

Boreal Residents

  • Spruce Grouse: one was seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on Dec 9.
  • Black-backed Woodpecker: one was observed at Mew Lake on Dec 10.
  • Boreal Chickadee: no reports; try Spuce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road north of the winter gate.
  • Canada Jay: seen at the Visitor Centre and Spruce Bog Boardwalk suet feeders, and along Opeongo Road from the winter gate northward.

Winter Finches

Reports featured continuing low numbers and fewer species.

  • Evening Grosbeak: counts at the Visitor Centre feeders went from 34 (Dec 6) to zero (Dec 11 and 12), with two there today; this species appears to be still moving through the Park.
  • Pine Grosbeak: daily numbers at the Visitor Centre feeders ranged from six to seventeen; and in total, 41 were counted along the highway between the West and East boundaries on Dec 10.
  • Common Redpoll: from one to eight were at the feeders on four days this week.
  • Hoary Redpoll: one at the Visitor Centre (see above). There were no reports of other finches.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


December 6, 2018

Better weather and more birders produced reports of more birds this week. An adult Golden Eagle (photo) soaring over Spruce Bog Boardwalk on Dec 4 was likely one of the small overwintering population in Algonquin that feeds on wolf kills. Four Bohemian Waxwings (photo) on Nov 30 and Dec 1, plus one today, were attracted by the birds at the Visitor Centre feeders. Ruffed Grouse (1), Wild Turkey (3) and Common Grackle (1) continued all week at the feeders.

Golden Eagle in Algonquin Park

Image: Adult Golden Eagle over Spruce Bog Boardwalk on 4 December 2018. Photo by Lev Frid.

Boreal Residents

  • Spruce Grouse: two males and three females were photographed in the spruce forest bordering the west side of the Sunday Creek valley on Dec 1; this area is on the south side of Highway 60 across from Spruce Bog Boardwalk.
  • Black-backed Woodpecker: a female was photographed at the Trailer Sanitation Station on Dec 4.
  • Boreal Chickadee: on Dec 4, two were along Spruce Bog Boardwalk and one (calling infrequently) was among about 25 Black-capped Chickadees attracted to seed left by birders near the Opeongo Road winter gate.
  • Canada Jay: seen this week at the Visitor Centre and Spruce Bog Boardwalk suet feeders, and along Opeongo Road from the winter gate northward.

Winter Finches

Numbers remained low but species diversity increased in this week’s reports.

  • Evening Grosbeak: daily numbers at the Visitor Centre feeders ranged from 12 to 34, perhaps indicating that the species continues to move through the area.
  • Pine Grosbeak: up to seven were seen daily at the Visitor Centre, and a few were regular along the highway edge.
  • Common Redpoll: there were daily counts of two to nine at the Visitor Centre, and two were noted along Opeongo Road on Dec 4.
  • Red Crossbill: a male was photographed on Highway 60 on Dec 1, and two of these crossbills were seen along Opeongo Road, Dec 4.
  • White-winged Crossbill: a male was photographed on Highway 60, Dec 1.
  • Pine Siskin and American Goldfinch: two of each were at the Visitor Centre feeders on most days.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


November 29, 2018

Canada Jay in Algonquin Park

Image: Canada Jay in Algonquin Park, 20 November 2018. Photo by Ken Morrison.

Temperatures moderated, several days had periods of wet snow and rain, and birders and their reports were scarce in Algonquin this week. The Visitor Centre feeders attracted Evening Grosbeak (about a dozen or fewer each day, but 27 on Nov 29), Pine Grosbeak (two to five each day), Common Redpoll (one on most days) and American Goldfinch (one or two on a couple of days). A few Pine Grosbeaks were seen along Highway 60 regularly as well. Other birds at the feeders this week included Ruffed Grouse (one) Wild Turkey (three), Canada Jay (one), Dark-eyed Junco (one until Nov 27) and Common Grackle (one). At this time last year, about 20 Blue Jays were coming to the feeders; so far this year there is one (reflecting the massive exodus of this species out of southern Ontario this fall in response to pending lower food availability).

A Common Merganser found dead on Highway 60 near West Smith Lake on Nov 22 may have mistaken the wet pavement for open water. Snow Buntings (two on Nov 27 and one on Nov 28) along the highway at Smoke Creek were typical of the occasional appearance of small numbers here in winter.

As last week, there was no new information about Spruce Grouse, Black-backed Woodpecker and Boreal Chickadee. Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road, north of the locked winter gate for those species and Canada Jay.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


November 22, 2018

Pine Grosbeak

Image: Russet-plumaged Pine Grosbeak with Common Redpoll in background. Photo by Michael Runtz (click image to enlarge).

This week featured very cold temperatures (for the date), frequent strong winds and significant snowfall, which combined to reduce the amount of birding done and reported. Snow depth is now about 25 cm (10 inches), and all lakes along Highway 60 except Smoke and Two Rivers are fully ice-covered. The suet feeder is installed past the first boardwalk at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and the two feeders and suet feeder off the Visitor Centre viewing deck are now operating. The Visitor Centre seed attracted an adult White-crowned Sparrow until November 21 (second latest fall date for Algonquin), a Common Grackle through today, and a Ruffed Grouse irregularly. An American Marten is not appearing there daily but it caught a shrew near the feeders today. One or more Martens are regular around the garbage containers at Mew Lake Campground.

Boreal Residents

There was no new information this week about the Boreal Residents. Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road, north of the locked winter gate. Winter Finches appear to be still moving through and numbers being reported are low. There were Evening Grosbeaks at the Visitor Centre seed every day this week but counts ranged from 45 on November 19 to only one or two on other days. Up to eight Pine Grosbeaks have been daily at the feeders, and a few have been seen along the highway as well. A single Common Redpoll was at the Visitor Centre yesterday and today. Pine Siskin came to the feeders most days but with a high count of only seven; and a lone American Goldfinch was there on November 19.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


November 15, 2018

Evening Grosbeak

Image: Male Evening Grosbeak at Visitor Centre. Photo by Ken Morrison (click image to enlarge).

Small lakes and ponds froze over on the cold night of November 10-11, and heavy snowfall occurred last night and today. Gates are now closed for the winter on the following roads: Arowhon, Centennial Ridges, Rock Lake and Opeongo (at Cameron Lake Road junction).

Noteworthy Observations

The following observations before the increased cold and snow set new latest fall dates for Algonquin:

  • American Woodcock (one flushed at the Airfield, Nov 10);
  • Greater Yellowlegs (one in a beaver pond between the East Gate and the Park boundary, Nov 8);
  • Great Black-backed Gull (adult with migrating flock of eight Herring and 12 Ring-billed gulls over the Visitor Centre, Nov 10); and
  • Double-crested Cormorant (adult at Opeongo Access Point, Nov 10).

Observations of two other species tied the latest fall date:

  • Winter Wren (along Highway 60 near Peck Lake, Nov 12) and
  • Fox Sparrow (at seed on the ground at the Visitor Centre, Nov 12).

A rare-in-Algonquin adult Golden Eagle seen at Opeongo Access Point on Nov 10 was noteworthy.

Boreal Residents

  • Spruce Grouse (no reports; try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road north of the winter gate);
  • Black-backed Woodpecker (reported along Highway 60 near Peck Lake on Nov 12 and on Big Pines Trail, Nov 13);
  • Canada Jay (best places to look are Opeongo Road from the winter gate northward and Spruce Bog Boardwalk); and
  • Boreal Chickadee (only report was one along the Mizzy Lake Trail rail bed, Nov 9).

Winter Finches

  • Evening Grosbeak (up to 25 at the Visitor Centre this week, but numbers variable);
  • Pine Grosbeak (becoming widespread, especially on roads after snowfall and sanding operations; up to 10 daily at the Visitor Centre);
  • Common Redpoll (small numbers seen occasionally);
  • Pine Siskin (one or two regularly at the Visitor Centre, and very small numbers elsewhere);
  • American Goldfinch (two at the Visitor Centre, Nov 11).
  • No reports this week for Purple Finch, Red Crossbill and White-winged Crossbill.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


November 8, 2018

Western Meadowlark

Western Meadowlark at Old Airfield, November 2, 2018. Photo by Jeff Skevington.

Extended periods of strong winds, rain and some snow during the week appeared to reduce the birder activity. Another pelagic (“two men and a boat” this time) on Lake Opeongo, November 2, noted Horned Grebe (1), Red-necked Grebe (2) and Greater Yellowlegs (3). The best find of the week was a Western Meadowlark (confirming photos of bird at Old Airfield on Nov. 2 and 3; new latest fall date for this very rare species here).

Noteworthy Observations

  • Golden Eagle (Opeongo Access Point, Nov. 3),
  • Greater Yellowlegs (near East Gate, Nov. 8; new latest fall date),
  • Double-crested Cormorant (adult at Opeongo Access Point, Nov 8; ties latest fall date), and
  • Lapland Longspur (nine on exposed mud, Park Lake, Nov. 3).

Boreal Residents

  • Spruce Grouse (try the Wolf Howl Pond area along the Mizzy Lake Trail railbed, and Spruce Bog Boardwalk);
  • Black-backed Woodpecker (seen along Mizzy Lake Trail railbed, Highway 60 near Pog Lake, and in Mew Lake Campground);
  • Canada Jay (the most reliable locations are Opeongo Road north of the winter gate and Spruce Bog Boardwalk); and
  • Boreal Chickadee (try the Mizzy Lake Trail railbed).

Boreal Residents

  • Evening Grosbeak (up to 11 at the Visitor Centre on several days);
  • Purple Finch (almost gone; one, Nov. 3);
  • Common Redpoll (regular but under ten reported at any location);
  • Red Crossbill (one at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Nov. 6);
  • Pine Siskin (a few sightings of one to four birds); and
  • American Goldfinch (almost gone; one or two at Visitor Centre some days).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


November 1, 2018

Great Black-backed Gull

First winter Great Black-backed Gull, Lake Opeongo, October 28, 2018. Photo by Jeff Skevington.

A heavy covering of snow occurred early in the week, but most of the snow has now melted during recent rain and higher temperatures. Mild conditions resulted in late observations for several species.

A very successful one-person “pelagic” on October 28, covering most of Lake Opeongo after an overnight snowfall and during periodic snow squalls, yielded photographs of Red-necked Grebe (total of 21 at three locations), Dunlin (5), White-rumped Sandpiper (1; new latest fall date here), Pectoral Sandpiper (6) and Great Black-backed Gull (first winter; new latest fall date for this very rare gull here). The shorebirds were feeding amid snow on exposed mud areas at the mouth of Hailstorm Creek. Lake Opeongo is Algonquin Park’s largest lake and is mostly inaccessible except by watercraft.

Noteworthy Observations

  • Long-tailed Duck (six on Lake of Two Rivers, October 26, were the first this fall);
  • Rough-legged Hawk (singles on October 28 and 29);
  • Golden Eagle (one over Highway 60 near Smoke Lake today);
  • Bohemian Waxwing (ten at the Old Airfield today);
  • Lapland Longspur (three at the Old Airfield, October 27 and today); and
  • Lincoln's Sparrow (a late bird was along the Mizzy Lake Trail railbed on October 27).

Boreal Residents

  • Spruce Grouse (try the Wolf Howl Pond area along the Mizzy Lake Trail railbed, and Spruce Bog Boardwalk);
  • Black-backed Woodpecker (seen along Mizzy Lake Trail railbed, and along the Track and Tower Trail starting from the southwest corner of the Old Airfield);
  • Canada Jay (the most reliable location is Opeongo Road north of the winter gate); and
  • Boreal Chickadee (one was found along the Mizzy Lake Trail railbed today).

Winter Finches

There is good species variety, but numbers are fairly low and many birds appear to be moving through.

  • Evening Grosbeak (single flyovers were reported, and a small flock was at the Visitor Centre on several days);
  • Pine Grosbeak (an adult male was at the Visitor Centre with Evening Grosbeaks on October 26 and 27, and a single bird was noted on Lake Opeongo on October 28);
  • Purple Finch (a few are still here);
  • Common Redpoll (becoming widespread in relatively small numbers);
  • Red Crossbill (small groups seen on three days this week);
  • White-winged Crossbill (three reports of one or two birds);
  • Pine Siskin (usually one or two seen at a time, but 30 reported at the Old Airfield on October 26); and
  • American Goldfinch (a few still present).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


October 25, 2018

The cold temperatures, significant wet snowfall (Wednesday) and north winds this week coincided with first-of-fall observations of several species, including: American Tree Sparrow (21st), Snow Bunting (22nd), Brant (flock of 550 photographed over the Mizzy Lake Trail railbed on the 24th), Common Goldeneye (24th), Sandhill Crane (flock of 24 photographed over the Mizzy Lake Trail railbed on the 24th), and Rough-legged Hawk (24th).

Sightings of birds apparently moving through the Park included a Boreal Chickadee photographed going south across the Old Airfield with Black-capped Chickadees and Red-breasted Nuthatches on October 22nd.

Bohemian Waxwings in Algonquin Park

Image: Bohemian Waxwings at Old Airfield on October 12, 2018. Photo by Lev Frid. (click image to enlarge)

Other Noteworthy Species

  • One Bohemian Waxwing at Radiant Lake (backcountry access only) on October 24 indicated that this species is still moving through; and
  • Lapland Longspurs were at the Old Airfield and the Visitor Centre this week.

Boreal Residents

  • Spruce Grouse (near Wolf Howl Pond along the Mizzy Lake Trail railbed, and Spruce Bog Boardwalk);
  • Black-backed Woodpecker (no reports; try Mizzy Lake Trail railbed, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road north of the winter gate (still open);
  • Canada Jay (Mizzy Lake Trail railbed, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road north of the winter gate); and
  • Boreal Chickadee (Mizzy Lake Trail railbed, and Spruce Bog Boardwalk).

Winter Finches

  • Evening Grosbeak (singles at the West Gate and Visitor Centre on October 22; and five at the Visitor Centre, today);
  • Purple Finch (only two reports, of one to three birds this week);
  • Common Redpoll (several small flocks feeding on Speckled Alder seeds on October 24 indicated increasing numbers);
  • Red Crossbill (a few birds on the East Side of Algonquin but no reports from the Highway 60 Corridor);
  • Pine Siskin (one or two birds flying over occasionally); and
  • American Goldfinch (a few still around).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


October 18, 2018

Noteworthy Observations

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Yellow-billed Cuckoo along the Opeongo Road during snow flurries on October 17, 2018. Photo by Geoff Carpentier.

Noteworthy observations during the two-week period in Algonquin Park included:

  • Snow Goose (twelve in a large flock of migrating Canadas photographed over the Old Airfield on October 13);
  • Northern Shoveler (two photographed high over Opeongo Road on October 17, a new latest fall date for this very rare species in Algonquin);
  • Yellow-billed Cuckoo (one photographed amid snow flurries along Opeongo Road on October 17, the second latest fall date for this very rare bird here);
  • Virgina Rail (one seen along the edge of Costello Creek a little beyond the Opeongo Road north bridge on October 17, a new latest fall date for Algonquin);
  • Bohemian Waxwing (a few at the Airfield and near Head Creek Marsh in the start of an expected flight; see Ron Pitttaway’s Winter Finch Forecast; and
  • Lapland Longspur (up to a dozen at the Old Airfield and ten along the Mizzy Lake Trail railbed at West Rose Lake).

Winter Finches

The cone crop is poor in Algonquin this year, and the Visitor Centre feeders are not operational yet, but some winter finches are being seen in Algonquin Park. Reports included:

  • Evening Grosbeak (fifteen near Head Creek Marsh on October 5);
  • Pine Grosbeak (one along the railbed at the chain gate east of Arowhon Road on October 17 was the first sighting this fall);
  • Purple Finch (a few are being seen regularly);
  • Common Redpoll (no Algonquin Park reports but a few nearby; one was reported at Tory Hill, Haliburton County, and two were at a Huntsville feeder for several days during the period);
  • Red Crossbill and White-winged Crossbill (no reports);
  • Pine Siskin (sightings of one or two flying over are frequent, and a few small flocks have also been noted);
  • American Goldfinch (small numbers are still being seen).

Boreal Chickadee

  • Spruce Grouse (seen fairly regularly along the Mizzy Lake Trail railbed near Wolf Howl Pond and at Spruce Bog Boardwalk);
  • Black-backed Woodpecker (observed frequently along the Mizzy Lake Trail railbed);
  • Canada Jay (regular from the winter gate northward on Opeongo Road and at Spruce Bog Boardwalk) and
  • Boreal Chickadee (reported along the Mizzy Lake railbed and along the Old Railway Bike Trail between the Airfield and Head Creek Marsh, where at least four appeared to be moving westward with a large number of Black-capped Chickadees on October 5).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the Park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).


Related Information

 

Reserve your developed or backcountry campsite for your next visit.

Share your passion for Algonquin Park by becoming a member or donor.

Special regulations for Algonquin's special fishery.