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Algonquin Park Birding Report

Algonquin Park Birding Reports provide visitors with species observed in recent days within Algonquin Park. Reports are compiled by Ron Tozer. We would greatly appreciate your Algonquin Park bird sightings. Please contact us with your recent sightings.

Upcoming Birding Workshops

  • Demystifying Algonquin Park Bird Song Workshop June 6 - 7, 2015 - Through indoor and field excursions, discover the techniques necessary to identify birds and their songs, comparing similar songsters, and learn how to use today's advanced technology to assist in making an identification. Pre-registration is required.

March 19, 2015

The Moose carcass placed in the Sunday Creek valley off the Visitor Centre deck over five weeks ago was visited by an Eastern Wolf yesterday morning and evening, and a Bald Eagle landed near the carcass in the evening. Four wolves, two Red Fox and a Bald Eagle were seen feeding today. View the carcass live via the Algonquin Park Webcam

First-of-spring sightings this week included: Canada Goose on March 11; Snow Bunting and Horned Lark on March 14; Brown Creeper singing on March 14 (30-year average is March 18); and Rough-legged Hawk on March 17.

The male American Three-toed Woodpecker seen well at the parking lot of the Trailer Sanitation Station at km 35.6 on March 12 has not been observed since despite several searches.

An American Marten continued to visit the suet feeder on Spruce Bog Boardwalk, including today.

Two Ruffed Grouse are still coming to get seed on the ground at the Visitor Centre feeders.

The Visitor Centre and restaurant are open daily (9 am to 5 pm) during March Break (March 14 to 22).

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: One was reported on March 14 at Mew Lake Campground, where there is adjacent Black Spruce habitat.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on March 13, 14 and 17; one was on Mizzy Lake Trail on March 17; and two were on a utility pole at Cache Lake on March 16.

Gray Jay: Observed at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Trailer Sanitation Station, Opeongo Road and near the East Gate this week.

Boreal Chickadee: Up to four continued to visit the suet feeder on Spruce Bog Boardwalk. One was observed on Mizzy Lake Trail on March 17.

Winter Finches

Common Redpoll: Numbers were higher again this week at the Visitor Centre feeders, reaching 80 to 100 birds. Other locations included 20 on Opeongo Road and 25 at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on March 17.

Hoary Redpoll: Two or three continued at the Visitor Centre feeders daily this week.

Pine Siskin: One came to the Visitor Centre feeders from March 12 onward.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


March 12, 2015

Beautiful sunny days and well-above-freezing temperatures this week made it feel like more early migrants should be arriving despite the deep snow and little open water. They didn't appear but it will happen soon.

Gray Jay in Algonquin Park

Gray Jay in Algonquin Park

The Gray Jay researchers had found fifteen nests by today. The first female incubating was observed on March 10, and now there are three of them.

For the first time since the moose carcass was placed in the Sunday Creek valley off the Visitor Centre deck four weeks ago, something finally visited it! Two Common Ravens fed on it occasionally during the morning of both yesterday and today. Surely more will come; perhaps during March Break. The Visitor Centre and restaurant will be open daily for March Break.

Two Ruffed Grouse were fairly regular visitors below the Visitor Centre feeders this week, and one was in the Spruce Bog Boardwalk parking lot on March 7 and 8.

One or two American Martens visited the suet feeder on Spruce Bog Boardwalk regularly. One was briefly at the Visitor Centre yesterday also. It did not make a dent in the eleven Red Squirrels present. This squirrel concentration at the feeders likely reflects the scarcity of cones here this winter.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: No reports this week. However, one was seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on March 3, so it is worth checking there.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One heard drumming was reported south and west of the km 52 highway marker on March 7.

Gray Jay: Still being seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road (such as at the closed gate at Cameron Lake Road). As more females start incubating, there will be fewer Gray Jays around to see, however.

Boreal Chickadee: Up to three continued to visit the suet feeder on Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Winter Finches

Common Redpoll: Numbers increased, peaking at 60 birds at the Visitor Centre feeders on March 10. A few were also seen getting seed put out by birders at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and on Opeongo Road near the closed gate.

Hoary Redpoll: Two and sometimes three (recognizable by plumage features as continuing birds) were seen at the Visitor Centre feeders daily this week.

Pine Siskin: One was along Opeongo Road on March 8 and another showed up at the Visitor Centre feeders today. They were likely on the move. Two sightings of single birds in mid February are the only other 2015 records for this finch here.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


March 5, 2015

Boreal Chickadee in Algonquin Park

Boreal Chickadee on the hand in Algonquin Park

There were more signs of early spring this week as temperatures moderated somewhat. A Europen Starling at the Visitor Centre on March 2 was the first spring migrant. Gray Jay researchers had located eight nests under construction by today.

Inexplicably, the Moose carcass placed in the Sunday Creek valley off the Visitor Centre deck has now gone three weeks without attracting mammals or birds. Perhaps there will be something to see during March Break (March 14 to 22), when the Visitor Centre and restaurant will be open daily (9 am to 5 pm).

An American Marten providing great views near the suet feeder on Spruce Bog Boardwalk was a life sighting for some this week as they fed the Boreal Chickadees. Also, one or two martens are reported to be almost daily at the Visitor Centre feeders now, although not present all day.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: One was observed along the northern part of Opeongo Road today. Males should be doing occasional flutter flight displays soon, which may help in locating them.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Reported twice this week on Opeongo Road. One of these woodpeckers was on a utility pole at km 52 on Highway 60 on February 27. Males may initiate nest cavity excavation during March, and utility poles are sometimes chosen. Watch for this woodpecker on these poles in black spruce areas.

Gray Jay: Still being seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road (such as at the closed gate at Cameron Lake Road).

Boreal Chickadee: Two were being observed at the closed gate on Opeongo Road and three were around the Spruce Bog Boardwalk suet feeder this week. Observers are again being thrilled by feeding Boreal Chickadees from the hand near the suet feeder. Thanks to Wayne Laubscher for the image.

Winter Finches

Common Redpoll: Numbers increased to 45 birds at the Visitor Centre feeders on March 2, but dropped back to about 15 by week's end.

Hoary Redpoll: Three individuals continued to be seen at the Visitor Centre feeders on most days this week.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


February 26, 2015

B-136Despite the continued very cold temperatures this week, the breeding season is underway for two species. The first Gray Jay nest under construction was found on February 22, and a Common Raven carrying a stick in its bill seen today on Opeongo Road was nest-building. The average date of the first observation of ravens building or re-lining nests in Algonquin is March 5, so today's sighting was actually a little early.

Remarkably, the road-killed moose put out in the Sunday Creek valley opposite the Visitor Centre over two weeks ago has still not attracted any birds or mammals. Surely that will change soon.

An American Marten spent much of the morning below the Visitor Centre feeders today, often listening intently for small mammals under the snow that are attracted to fallen seed. This marten has become a little more regular in its visits this week.

Tomorrow (February 27) is Bird Feeder Friday in Algonquin Park. The Algonquin Park Webcam will be pointed at the bird feeder from dawn until dusk. Thanks to our sponsors of this event - Wild Birds Unlimited Toronto, EarthCam, and Couples Resort.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Birders should look and listen for this species in black spruce areas along Opeongo Road and Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Gray Jay: Still being seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road (such as at the closed gate at Cameron Lake Road).

Boreal Chickadee: One or two continued to be observed well at the suet feeder on Spruce Bog Boardwalk this week. One was heard on Opeongo Road on February 21. The parking lot of the Algonquin Logging Museum is another site for this species; one was reported feeding from the hand along with Black-capped Chickadees there last week.

Winter Finches

Common Redpoll: Up to 25 birds are still coming daily to the Visitor Centre feeders.

Hoary Redpoll: Three individuals continued to be seen at the Visitor Centre feeders on most days this week.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


February 19, 2015

Just when deep snow and apparently endless cold temperatures seemed to suggest winter would never end, one of Algonquin's earlier signs of spring occurred right on time to lift our spirits this week: gathering of nest material by Gray Jays was observed.

The road-killed moose put out in the Sunday Creek valley opposite the Visitor Centre over a week ago has still not attracted any birds or mammals, but likely will soon. A similar carcass in a previous year was present for two weeks before anything starting feeding on it.

A first year Northern Shrike watched birds at the Visitor Centre feeders for about 15 minutes before flying off when chased by a Downy Woodpecker on February 13. Young bird-predators such as shrikes have a steep learning curve.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk. Occasional displaying by ever-hopeful males should soon make it easier to locate this boreal phantom.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Drumming was heard at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on February 14 and one of these woodpeckers was seen there on February 15.

Gray Jay: Being seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Mew Lake Campground and Opeongo Road (such as at the closed gate at Cameron Lake Road).

Boreal Chickadee: Up to four provided close-up photo opportunities at the suet feeder on Spruce Bog Boardwalk this week. Two were seen on Opeongo Road on February 14 and 18, and four were noted near Wolf Howl Pond on February 15. The frequency of calling by males will increase in late February and March and reach a peak just before winter flock breakup in April, making the species easier to locate in the coming weeks.

Winter Finches

Pine Grosbeak: Two were along the highway at West Smith Lake on February 14.

Common Redpoll: The small flock of 10 to 20 birds continues at the Visitor Centre feeders.

Hoary Redpoll: Two or three individuals were present daily at the Visitor Centre feeders.

Pine Siskin: One was reported heard on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on February 15.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


February 12, 2015

A moose that was killed by a vehicle on Highway 60 in the Park has been placed in the Sunday Creek valley where it is viewable from the Visitor Centre viewing deck. It may soon attract ravens, Bald Eagles and wolves.

Martens have been observed this week at both the Visitor Centre and Spruce Bog Boardwalk suet feeders.

As part of the Winter in the Wild Festival 2015, a Park Naturalist will guide visitors to look for boreal birds along Spruce Bog Boardwalk in the morning (10 to 11:30) and afternoon (2:30 to 4) on Saturday, February 14.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Birders observed one at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on February 8 and 11.

Black-backed Woodpecker: No sightings were reported this week, but recent drumming heard at Spruce Bog Boardwalk was thought to be by this woodpecker.

Gray Jay: Being seen at the Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Mew Lake Campground and Opeongo Road (such as at the closed gate at Cameron Lake Road).

Boreal Chickadee: Two or three continue to be seen at the suet feeder near the register box on Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Winter Finches

Pine Grosbeak: One was along Highway 60 at km 8 on February 11. There have been very few seen here this winter.

Common Redpoll: The small flock of up to 21 birds continues daily at the Visitor Centre feeders.

Hoary Redpoll: Three individuals were present at the Visitor Centre feeders.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


February 5, 2015

The female Mallard that had been in small areas of flowing water at the outlet of Park Lake since December 9 was last seen on Thursday (January 29). Predation appears to be the most likely reason for its disappearance.

Two Ruffed Grouse continue to come to get seed below the Visitor Centre feeders.

Boreal Specialties

Birders searching for Spruce Grouse and Black-backed Woodpecker this week reported no success. Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road are still the best places to try.

Gray Jay: Still being seen at the Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, and Opeongo Road (such as at the closed gate at Cameron Lake Road).

Boreal Chickadee: Two or three were observed at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on at least four days this week. They are visiting the suet feeder near the register box not far from the entrance of the trail. One or two were also noted along the Bat Lake Trail this week.

Winter Finches

White-winged Crossbill: Six were seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on February 1. This was the first report since January 4.

Common Redpoll: Up to seventeen were at the Visitor Centre feeders this week.

Hoary Redpoll: Three continued at the Visitor Centre feeders for most of the week, with one reported still there today.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


January 29, 2015

Unusual-here-in-midwinter sightings this week included: an adult male Sharp-shinned Hawk photographed near the East Gate (January 27), a Northern Shrike at the Visitor Centre (today), and seven Bohemian Waxwings briefly attracted to trees near the Visitor Centre feeders by the presence of other birds (January 27).

Mallard in Algonquin Park

Mallard observed at Park Lake outlet this week.

Especially for those who have contacted me about "Super Mallard", this female completed another week in the limited open water at the outlet of Park Lake.

Common Redpoll daily numbers at the Visitor Centre feeders since late December have been highly variable, from four to sixteen. This may suggest a change in individuals but definitely indicates a lack of feeder fidelity. In contrast, one Hoary Redpoll has been present every day since December 30, and a second bird has been with it every day since January 14. Interesting that the Hoary Redpolls stay put and the Common Redpolls do not. There are no other feeders for many kilometres around.

An American Marten was at the Visitor Centre suet feeder on a couple of days this week, which may mean it will become more regular now.

The Algonquin Park Webcam will be aimed at one of the Visitor Centre feeders all day tomorrow (Friday, January 30).

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk. Ruffed Grouse were reported there this week but not Spruce Grouse (although they are there!).

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on January 24 and 26.

Gray Jay: Still being seen at the Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, and Opeongo Road (gate closed at Cameron Lake Road).

Boreal Chickadee: Two were observed along Opeongo Road north of the gate and two were at Spruce Bog Boardwalk, on January 26.

Winter Finches

Red Crossbill: Two females were down on the highway at Park Lake (between the West Boundary and the West Gate) on January 23. This was the first Algonquin sighting since January 3.

Common Redpoll: From eleven to sixteen were at the Visitor Centre feeders each day this week.

Hoary Redpoll: Two continued at the Visitor Centre feeders all week, and a third joined them today.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


January 22, 2015

Black-backed Woodpecker in Algonquin Park. Photo by Tony deGroot.

Black-backed Woodpecker

 

There were some spectacularly sunny, cool days in the Park this week. But no sightings of American Three-toed Woodpecker following last week's report of a male on Opeongo Road. An American Marten visited the suet feeders at the Visitor Centre, unsuccessfully chased a Red Squirrel and soon disappeared, on January 19 -- only the second marten sighting there this winter, where they are often regular in this season.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: None reported. Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was noted along Opeongo Road on January 16 and another was photographed on Spruce Bog Boardwalk during the weekend.

Gray Jay: Still being seen at the Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road and Mew Lake Campground.

Boreal Chickadee in Algonquin Park. Photo by Tony deGroot.

Boreal Chickadee in Algonquin Park

 

Boreal Chickadee: Two or three were observed on Spruce Bog Boardwalk near the suet feeder on January 16 and 17. One was found along Opeongo Road near the Cameron Lake Road on January 17.

Winter Finches

Common Redpoll: From five to eleven were at the Visitor Centre feeders each day this week.

Hoary Redpoll: Two continued at the Visitor Centre feeders all week.

A special thanks to Tony deGroot for use of his images of Black-backed Woodpecker and Boreal Chickadee observed in Algonquin Park this week.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


January 15, 2015

The bird of the week was a male American Three-toed Woodpecker. See below for details.

Winter finch diversity and numbers remain very low. Common Redpolls may still be on the move as briefly higher numbers at the Visitor Centre feeders declined this week. However, yesterday and today, a second Hoary Redpoll joined the long-visiting female at the feeders.

One or two Ruffed Grouse continue to be regular near the Visitor Centre feeders, especially in early morning and late afternoon.

The female Mallard, now dubbed "Cold Duck" after surviving temperatures below minus 30 degrees C on one night this week, continued at the Park Lake outlet. For over a month this duck has remained in or near a patch of rapidly flowing water both day and night. Somehow it has found enough to eat and avoided predation. There are just four known previous winter occurrences of Mallard in Algonquin Park, but none this far into January.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Seven were reported in the area of the register box and suet feeder on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on January 14.

American Three-toed Woodpecker: A male was reported along Opeongo Road on January 14.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road. One was heard on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on January 10.

Gray Jay: Still being seen at the Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road and Mew Lake Campground.

Boreal Chickadee: Three were observed on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on January 10, and one was at the suet feeder there on January 14.

Winter Finches

Pine Grosbeak: Three were seen along Opeongo Road on January 10.

Common Redpoll: From two to eight were at the Visitor Centre feeders each day this week.

Hoary Redpoll: The female continued to come to the Visitor Centre feeders, and there was a second bird there also on January 14 and 15.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


January 8, 2015

Algonquin's version of Duck Dynasty continued with the female Mallard remaining at the Park Lake outlet all week. A Northern Shrike (shown below) was seen at the Visitor Centre on January 4 and 6. Barred Owls responded to vocal imitations near Jake Lake, at the Highland Backpacking Trail entrance, along the Highland Backpacking Trail and at the east end of Lake of Two Rivers during the day on the Algonquin Park Christmas Bird Count of January 3.

Northern Shrike in Algonquin Park

Northern Shrike observed at the Algonquin Park Visitor Centre this week.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: One was noted along Spruce Bog Boardwalk on January 3.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Single birds were observed on Spruce Bog Boardwalk, in Sunday Creek Bog below the Visitor Centre, on Opeongo Road, and along the Highland Backpacking Trail on January 3.

Gray Jay: Seen at the Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, Opeongo Road and Mew Lake Campground.

Boreal Chickadee: Two or three were fairly regular around the suet feeder near the register box on Spruce Bog Boardwalk, and the species was seen along the black spruce section of Opeongo Road, this week.

Winter Finches

White-winged Crossbill: Two were reported at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on January 4.

Common Redpoll: Up to twelve were regular at the Visitor Centre feeders.

Hoary Redpoll: The female continued to come to the Visitor Centre feeders all week.

Pine Siskin: One was heard calling in flight over Lookout Trail on December 31.

American Goldfinch: Only one was observed on the Algonquin Christmas Bird Count (January 3).

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


January 4, 2015 - Algonquin Park Christmas Bird Count

The 41st Algonquin Park Christmas Bird Count (CBC) was held on Saturday, January 3, 2015. A total of 64 observers recorded 20 species (tied lowest ever in 1997; average is 28) and 1,148 individual birds (average is 4,785). The birds per party hour was 6, but a low of 4 birds per party hour has occurred in two previous years. The highlight of the count was a Hoary Redpoll observed at the Visitor Centre feeders since December 30. For complete details see the 2014 Algonquin Park Christmas Bird Count summary.

Hoary Redpoll in Algonquin Park
Hoary Redpoll (left) and Common Redpoll (right) at the Algonquin Visitor Centre. The rarer Hoary Redpoll shows a paler rump, less streaking on the sides, and a slightly smaller bill compared to the Common Redpoll. Hoary Redpolls in Algonquin Park are often mixed in Common Redpoll flocks making identification challenging. (Click to enlarge image.)

January 1, 2015

A Hoary Redpoll at the Visitor Centre feeders and Pine Grosbeaks on the highway were highlights this week (see below).

The female Mallard at the Park Lake outlet was still present on December 30, despite the onset of temperatures well below freezing.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: One was seen on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on December 26.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was observed on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on December 28, and there was one on Track and Tower Trail on December 30.

Gray Jay: Seen at the Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road again this week.

Boreal Chickadee: Look and listen for them at the suet feeder near the register box on Spruce Bog Boardwalk. Two or three were around the feeder regularly this week. Also, two were observed along the rail bed section of the Mizzy Lake Trail on December 29.

Winter Finches

Pine Grosbeak: There were three on December 29 and four on December 30 on Highway 60 between km 8 and 10. These are the first reported here since November.

Common Redpoll: Thirty at the Visitor Centre on December 27 was the highest count there this winter, and perhaps suggestive of increasing numbers of this species in the Park.

Hoary Redpoll: One showed up at the Visitor Centre feeders on December 30 and was photographed there on the 31st and today.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


December 25, 2014

A Merry Christmas and good birding in 2015!

The female Mallard first noted at the Park Lake outlet on December 9 has persisted all this week as well, being seen at open water both north and south of the highway. Winter records of this duck are very rare in Algonquin.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Two males and a female were high in a Balsam Fir about 15 metres down the trail from the entrance at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on December 22.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Gray Jay: Seen at the Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road again this week.

Boreal Chickadee: Look and listen for them around the suet feeder near the register box on Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Winter Finches

Common Redpoll: Up to seven were reported at the Visitor Centre feeders this week.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


December 18, 2014

Contrary to expectations, the female Mallard continued to be seen at a small patch of open water at the Park Lake outlet all week. Despite being a "sitting duck", she has survived!

Mallard in Algonquin Park

Female Mallard observed at Park Lake outlet on December 9, 2014

 

 

A couple of Ruffed Grouse are coming regularly for seed under the Visitor Centre feeders.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Black-backed Woodpecker: A female was 20 metres north of the Spruce Bog Boardwalk parking lot on December 13.

Gray Jay: Seen at the Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road again this week.

Boreal Chickadee: Four were observed around the suet feeder near the register box on Spruce Bog Boardwalk on December 14.

Winter Finches

Common Redpoll: Present in small numbers. From zero to 12 were reported at the Visitor Centre feeders on days this week.

Evening Grosbeak: One was at the Visitor Centre feeders on December 15.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


December 11, 2014

Even though it is not officially winter yet, winter-like conditions prevail in the Park now. The deepest parts of Smoke Lake remain ice-free but all other lakes along the Highway 60 Corridor are covered with thin ice. About 20 cm of snow today enhanced the winter scenery.

A female Mallard photographed at a patch of open water at the outlet of Park Lake on December 9 will soon depart, but the one or two Wild Turkeys occasionally seen along Highway 60 this week will attempt to over-winter, mostly without food provided by people. A Ruffed Grouse is regular at the Visitor Centre feeders early and late in the day. The first Hoary Redpoll of the winter in Algonquin was seen on December 2 (see below for details).

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road. One was seen at Opeongo Road on December 10.

Gray Jay: Present at the Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road again this week.

Boreal Chickadee: One was observed at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on December 6 and 7. This species may be starting to visit the suet feeder near the register box on this trail.


Winter Finches

Common Redpoll: From one to six were observed each day at the Visitor Centre feeders this week.

Hoary Redpoll: One with a Common Redpoll was seen foraging on the ground at the Opeongo Access Point on December 2.

Birders reporting records through eBird are encouraged to share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds).

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


December 4, 2014

Spruce Grouse in Algonquin Park
Male Spruce Grouse

Only the larger lakes have any open water now. Lake of Two Rivers became ice-covered on November 29, the same date as last year. This is the second earliest date since records began in 1972. The earliest ice-in date for this lake was 28 November 1995.

The suet feeder is now in place near the register box on Spruce Bog Boardwalk. Gray Jays have been attracted so far, but Boreal Chickadees may start visiting it as in previous winters.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: One was reported roosting in a tree along Beaver Pond Trail on November 27, and one was seen on Spruce Bog Boardwalk the same day.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Gray Jay: At the Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road again this week.

Boreal Chickadee: Try the black spruce section along Opeongo Road and at Spruce Bog Boardwalk.

Winter Finches

Very limited numbers and species variety reported.

Pine Grosbeak: Two were near the Visitor Centre on November 28.

Evening Grosbeak: One was at the Visitor Centre feeders on November 27, but the species has not been reported since.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


November 27, 2014

Relatively few reports again this week.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Gray Jay: At the Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road this week.

Boreal Chickadee: Heard in black spruce section of northern Opeongo Road on November 23.

Winter Finches

Pine Grosbeak: One was seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on November 23.

Evening Grosbeak: A male was at the Visitor Centre feeders on November 26.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


November 20, 2014

BAmerican Goldfinch in Algonquin Park
American Goldfinch in Algonquin Park

Big snowfall (about 68 cm over three days in western Algonquin Park), Highway 60 closure today, gusty winds and few birders - all severely limited observations this week.

A light morph adult Rough-legged Hawk in the Eos Lake and Ring-neck Pond area from November 14 to 16 was unusual here for lingering.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Gray Jay: At the Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road this week.

Boreal Chickadee: Try Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road.

Winter Finches

Pine Siskin: Numbers slowly increasing at the Visitor Centre feeders, with 13 there on November 19.

American Goldfinch: Declining numbers at the Visitor Centre feeders, with only one on November 19.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


November 13, 2014

Bohemian Waxwing in Algonquin Park
Bohemian Waxwing in Algonquin Park

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: One was seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on November 12.

Black-backed Woodpecker: One was along Spruce Bog Boardwalk on November 11.

Gray Jay: Reported at the Visitor Centre, Spruce Bog Boardwalk and Opeongo Road this week.

Boreal Chickadee: Two were noted at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on November 11.

Winter Finches

Small numbers of winter finches so far, but good variety.

Pine Grosbeak: One was at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on November 11.

Purple Finch: Last report was on November 6. Perhaps none left.

Red Crossbill: Four observed along the Old Railway Bike Trail at Head Creek Marsh on November 9. (Access bike trail at Old Airfield and walk west toward Cache Lake.)

White-winged Crossbill: One noted along the Old Railway Bike Trail at Head Creek Marsh on November 9.

Common Redpoll: One was observed at the Visitor Centre on November 9 and 11, the latter in a goldfinch flock. Twelve were seen along the Old Railway Bike Trail at Head Creek Marsh on November 9.

Pine Siskin: One was at the Visitor Centre feeders on November 13.

American Goldfinch: About 20 birds were regular at the Visitor Centre feeders this week.

Evening Grosbeak: Two females came to the Visitor Centre feeders on November 13.

Additional Species

Ruffed Grouse: One is visiting the Visitor Centre feeders regularly in the early morning.

Bohemian Waxwing: Six were feeding on Winterberry Holly (Ilex) berries along the Old Railway Bike Trail at Head Creek Marsh on November 9. One was seen at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on November 11.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


November 6, 2014

Noteworthy species this week included a Bohmeian Waxwing and a Pine Grosbeak at the Old Airfield on November 3.

Boreal Specialties

Pine Grosbeak in Algonquin Park
Male Pine Grosbeak in Algonquin Park

Spruce Grouse: Reported again this week along the edge of Opeongo Road in the black spruce section.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Found in the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake area of the Mizzy Lake Trail.

Gray Jay: Seen along the rail bed section of Mizzy Lake Trail; along Opeongo Road; and at the Visitor Centre.

Boreal Chickadee: Three were seen along the border of the Old Airfield.

Winter Finches

Pine Grosbeak (shown right): The first of the fall (and in 2014) was at the Old Airfield on November 3.

Purple Finch: One was at the Visitor Centre today.

Common Redpoll: Lev Frid reported several moving through this week.

American Goldfinch: A few still present but most appear to have left.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


October 30, 2014

Single Golden Eagles over the Visitor Centre yesterday and at Lookout Trail today were noteworthy.

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse (shown right): Reported this week along the edge of Opeongo Road in the black spruce section, early in the morning.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Found in the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake area of the Mizzy Lake Trail; on Spruce Bog Boardwalk after the first boardwalk; and on Lookout Trail.

Gray Jay: Seen along the rail bed section of Mizzy Lake Trail; along Opeongo Road; and at the Visitor Centre.

Boreal Chickadee: Observations were at km 4 on Arowhon Road; near Wolf Howl Pond along the Mizzy Lake Trail; and at Spruce Bog Boardwalk parking lot.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: One was at the Visitor Centre on October 27, and two were noted along Opeongo Road today. Most have departed.

Common Redpoll: More were observed this week, with 15 on Lookout Trail and 20 along Opeongo Road today.

Pine Siskin: Small numbers were noted, usually calling in flight.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


October 23, 2014

Hawk Watch

Algonquin Park is not known as a place to see hawk migration and so Lev Frid's report of the following from the cliff top at Lookout Trail on October 22 was noteworthy: Turkey Vulture (18), Bald Eagle (4), Northern Harrier (1), Northern Goshawk (3), Red-tailed Hawk (12), Rough-legged Hawk (1) and Golden Eagle (2).

Boreal Specialties

Spruce Grouse: There were recent sightings near Wolf Howl Pond on Mizzy Lake Trail.

Black-backed Woodpecker: Reported in the Wolf Howl Pond/West Rose Lake area of Mizzy Lake Trail.

Gray Jay: Seen at Wolf Howl Pond and West Rose Lake along the Mizzy Lake Trail; at Spruce Bog Boardwalk; along Opeongo Road; and at the Logging Museum.

Boreal Chickadee: Observations near Wolf Howl Pond and along Opeongo Road.

Winter Finches

Purple Finch: Still a few being observed, but becoming much less frequent.

White-winged Crossbill: Six were at the Old Airfield on October 22.

Common Redpoll: Four observed by Lev Frid at Spruce Bog Boardwalk on October 22 were the first this fall.

Pine Siskin: Small numbers were noted, usually calling in flight.

American Goldfinch: Few reports. Most may have left.

Evening Grosbeak: Singles and very small groups reported.

Birders reporting records through eBird can share their lists with the Algonquin Park Bird Records account (APPbirds). We encourage you to do so.

Please send us any bird sightings you've had in the park, even of common birds, as they assist us in documenting Algonquin Park's bird life.


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